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Can Dogs Eat Zucchini? | Is Zucchini Good for Dogs?

is zucchini good for dogs

Whether your pup loves sneaking veggies from your garden or begging for a bite off your plate, many people wonder can dogs eat zucchini?  Many vegetables are safe for dogs, but not all of them!  So, is zucchini good for dogs? We did the research to find out, so keep reading!

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Can Dogs Eat Zucchini? (The Short Answer)

Zucchini is one of the many vegetables that is safe for pups to eat!  Not only that, but it has a ton of health benefits for dogs as well as humans.  It’s safe both cooked and raw, but like anything, it’s important to feed this treat in moderation and not make it a huge part of your dog’s diet.  Additionally, remember that if you add seasonings to your zucchini, you should avoid feeding it to your dog.

It’s important to remember, that even with the best of intentions, accidents happen and dogs can easily eat things they shouldn’t.  Unfortunately, even if those accidents aren’t fatal, they can result in huge, unexpected veterinary expenses.  That’s why we recommend all responsible dog owners get a free, online pet insurance quote from Healthy Paws.

Is Zucchini Good For Dogs?

We’ve already answered the question, “can dogs eat zucchini?” Now, let’s learn about the benefits of feeding your dog this food! Is zucchini good for dogs?

Zucchini is a low-calorie treat, but the health benefits don’t stop there!  It has an abundance of vitamins, minerals, and fiber making it super healthy.  Keep in mind though that if your dog is being fed a complete, balanced diet that vegetables are not necessary as they should be getting all their essential nutrients from their daily food.  That doesn’t mean that the extra health value of foods like zucchini is bad for them.  In fact zucchini is a great option to use as treats for overweight dogs, as each cup of raw zucchini only has about 20 calories and is low in fat and cholesterol.

Is Zucchini Bad For Dogs?

We’ve already answered the question, “can dogs eat zucchini?” Now, let’s learn about the dangers of feeding your dog this food! Is zucchini bad for dogs?

The most important thing to remember about feeding anything to your dog is to do so in moderation.  This applies to zucchini as well.  As a general rule of thumb, you shouldn’t make zucchini more than 10% of your dog’s daily food intake.  While our pups typically digest zucchini well, new foods and large amounts of foods are always a risk for digestive upset so make sure to feed in moderation and monitor your dog’s reaction.

One thing to keep in mind is that we as humans tend to top our cooked zucchini with seasonings, many of which can be dangerous to our four-legged friends.  Only feed your dog plain zucchini with no additives.  Finally, make sure the pieces of zucchini you feed your pup are small to reduce their risk of choking.

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Other Varieties & Related Foods:

Can Dogs Eat Zucchini Raw?

Yes, dogs can eat zucchini raw!  So even if they sneak one straight from the garden, they’ll likely be just fine.

Can Dogs Eat Zucchini Squash?

Yes!  Zucchini squash is another name for green zucchini which is perfectly safe for our pups.

Can Dogs Eat Zucchini Bread?

It depends.  While the zucchini in the bread isn’t an issue, there could be other ingredients that are.  In general, it’s best to avoid it as the high sugar content can upset your dog’s stomach anyway.

Is Zucchini Skin Safe for Your Pup?

While not toxic, it’s best to peel the zucchini before giving it to your dog as the skin is the hardest part to digest.

In Conclusion: Can Dogs Have Zucchini?

Is zucchini good for dogs?  Absolutely.  As long as you don’t feed it as more than 10% of your pup’s diet, avoid seasonings, and watch them carefully to make sure they don’t choke.  Make this an occasional treat or a more reoccurring component of your dog’s diet!

Want to Learn More?

Check out these related articles from our “Read Before You Feed” series for more advice on safe foods for dogs!

Disclaimer: We are not veterinarians and this article should not be taken as medical or veterinary advice.  If you have any questions about your pet’s health or dietary needs, please contact your local veterinarian.